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The Ecclesiological Society

For those who love churches

For those who love churches

Welcome to the Ecclesiological Society website! Whether you are an expert on church history and church architecture, or merely curious our Society provides lots of information, publications, images, news & events. You might want to sign up to our free e-newsletter, or think about becoming a member of the Society and join in its events and receive its publications.

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News

THE STEPHEN DYKES BOWER MEMORIAL LECTURE: Notre Dame de Paris

THE STEPHEN DYKES BOWER MEMORIAL LECTURE

THE CATHEDRAL OF NOTRE DAME: ITS BUILDING, VIOLLET-LE-DUC’S MID-19TH CENTURY RESTORATION, THE FIRE OF APRIL, 2019, AND THE CHALLENGES OF ITS REPAIR AND RECONSTRUCTION.

The Ecclesiological Society’s annual Dykes Bower Memorial Lecture will take place on Wednesday 4 December.

Our speakers will be architectural historian, Dr Alexandra Gajowski, FSA; Charles Brown, Surveyor of the Fabric, 1978-1996, and architect for the reconstruction of the South Transept roof at York Minster; and Mr Andrew Arrol, architect and present Surveyor of the Fabric at York Minster. Andrew Arrol, present Surveyor of the Fabric at the Minster, recently visited Notre Dame to inspect the fire damage and the temporary precautionary works that have been undertaken since the fire in April.

6.15 pm for 6.30 pm on Wednesday 4th December in the Lecture Room of The Art Workers’ Guild, 6, Queen Square, Bloomsbury, London, W.C.1., followed by an informal reception.

The nearest London Underground stations are Holborn and Russell Square. Please direct any queries about access to the Guild’s premises or other matters should be made to Paul Velluet at paul.velluet@velluet.com.

Applications for tickets at £17.50 each should be sent to:

Paul Velluet,
9, Bridge Road,
St Margaret’s,
Twickenham,
Middlesex, TW1 1RE;

attaching a cheque payable to The Ecclesiological Society and a stamped, self-addressed envelope, or providing an e-mail address to which tickets can be sent,

OR by applying to Paul Velluet at paul.velluet@velluet.com, providing an e-mail address to which tickets can be sent, and making a direct payment to CAF Bank Ltd, Sort code: 40-52-40, Account number: 00030120, Name: The Ecclesiological Society, adding the reference DB19 and your name.

2019 Conference: Chancel screens since the Reformation

The theme of the Ecclesiological Society’s 2019 conference is the development of the chancel screen in British parish churches from the Reformation to the modern day. The destruction of the rood and rood loft during the Reformation removed key aspects of the meaning and purpose of the screen. How and why did chancel screens survive at all? Yet they were not per se targeted by iconoclasts and, indeed, new chancel screens were erected across the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. After a period when relatively few new screens were erected, the nineteenth century saw a revival in their creation, led by the Ecclesiologists, as well as the extensive adaptation (and even removal) of old ones. The building of a new generation of Roman Catholic churches also touched upon the role of chancel screens and whether they were, or were not, an integral requirement for proper worship. The continuation of interest in screens in the twentieth century – even in some modernist churches – may surprise, but shows the lasting contribution which screens make to our notions of what a church should look like and how it should function. Fittingly, therefore, the conference will end with a panel discussion about the adaptation and relocation of screens today and will include a presentation about a new screen being designed for a church in Kent.

Details of speakers and the booking form can be found by clicking the “Events” tab.

Featured church

St Mary, Abbotsbury, Newton Abbot, Devon

In July 1903 the first public announcement appeared that a new church was being contemplated to replace the small and ancient St Mary’s in the parish of Highweek, Newton Abbot, Devon. It was a popular decision and donations poured in, with...

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